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Latest in In Focus


The story of Om Hamada

Like every day, she wakes up at the break of dawn. Sending her children off to school, she heads off to her new job in the city of Zagazig, the capital of Sharqeya governorate.

Sarah El Masry

Street children: What they are not

We see them everywhere. They beg, they clean cars, they fight in the street. We see mothers with their babies and babies without their mothers. We see them in wheelchairs, sitting on the ground, leaning on our cars. Begging, touching us. Asking us to help them, for the love of God. We see them sleeping in the street, under a blanket, on a piece of cardboard. Sometimes, we mistake them for a pile of garbage. They are everywhere, all day, all night. We call them street children and most of us have never exchanged a single word with them.

Daily News Egypt

A daunting mission: Getting back Egypt’s stolen assets

Over the course of Hosni Mubarak’s rule, the illicit outflow of funds from Egypt are estimated at $132bn. After the January 2011 Revolution, countries such as Switzerland and the United Kingdom have been asked to freeze and repatriate Egypt’s stolen wealth. However, many legal, political and financial hindrances stand in the way. Daily News Egypt examines these hurdles and the efforts the Egyptian and foreign governments have exerted in order to recover these lost assets.

Sarah El Masry

Belly Dance in Egypt

Belly dancing is one of the most fascinating styles of dance in Egypt. Cairo is known as the global capital of belly dancing. Following the increasing appearance of foreign belly dancers in Egypt’s nightclubs and casinos, the Daily News Egypt looks at the belly dancing industry in Egypt and learns about the different techniques and styles of belly dancing. Considering the Muslim Brotherhood’s influence in Egyptian politics, some are concerned that belly dancing might become more restricted in Egypt. Belly dancers, though, have faith that their profession will continue to grow.

Ethar Shalaby

A polarised media: Religious satellite TV channels

In a deeply polarised media climate, Egyptians must choose between secular or religious satellite TV channels. Religious channels are a widely used source of information for social and personal issues, but have also been accused of broadcasting political agendas, inciting sectarianism, and spreading hate speech. The Daily News Egypt explores the topic of religious TV channels, and speaks to people on both sides of the debate.

Sarah El Masry

The coverage of violence against women

Egyptian women experience various forms of discrimination in public and private life. One of the biggest results of discrimination is violence. Although the media condemns violence and raises awareness about its enormity in some outlets, it has been accused of accidently perpetuating violence as well. Daily News Egypt investigates how violence against Egyptian women is covered in both printed and televised media.

Sarah El Masry

Educating with a broomstick

Officials claim incidents of violence against students are ‘minor’, while some parents support ‘harmless’ beatings to keep the kids under control

Ethar Shalaby

Al-Azhar of post-revolutionary Egypt

Al-Azhar recently issued a document renouncing violence as an attempt to pacify angry protestors and unify opposition forces under its umbrella. In light of this document, the newly passed constitution, the amendments of Al-Azhar’s regulatory law and the appointment of a new Grand Mufti, the Daily News Egypt investigates the features of Al-Azhar’s role in the politics and public life of post-revolutionary Egypt.

Sarah El Masry

A paralysed city: The diesel fuel crisis

Though it is not the first time a gas or diesel shortage has plagued Cairo and several other governorates, the recent crisis in Egypt has left the capital city paralysed due to a major strike organised by microbus drivers. It seems these strikes by transport drivers are much larger than they have been in the past. Daily News Egypt investigates the mounting diesel fuel problems in the country, looking at how they are affecting ordinary citizens and what the government is doing in response.

Sarah El Masry

Where corruption thrives: Public universities in Egypt

Public universities in Egypt are institutions with multi-layered corruption from sexual harassment to nepotism. The Daily News Egypt was intrigued by a recent corruption case in Ain Shams University to look into the different forms of corruption directed at students at public universities. Students recount their experiences with corruption and what they think the solutions are.

Sarah El Masry

The Battle of the Camel: Understanding the ‘counter-revolutionaries’

A common practice in Egypt has been to label your opposition as thugs, anti-Islamists or remnants of the former regime. These kabels are applied all too frequently and all too easily, as a means to justify one group’s actions over another. a closer look at the battle that took place on 2 February 2011 shows there were legitimate grounds for concern among the “regime remnants” that attacked the square that day; just as the revolutionaries fought for their lives, so too did their opposition

Luiz Sanchez

Two years after the revolution: how our families changed

Many are hesitant about terming what happened in Egypt on 25 January 2011 a “revolution”. Their justification is that a revolution must break away from the past socially, politically and economically to create a new status quo. And this is not the case in Egypt. Yet. Egypt is undergoing political and economic change, but many people claim that socially nothing changed, at least positively. While it might take years to fully examine the changes in social and familial attitudes and behaviours, it is hard to turn a blind eye to the changes that have already occurred two years after 25 January 2011. Daily News Egypt speaks Egyptians and their families who have experienced changes that would not have occurred without the “revolution”.

Sarah El Masry

Institutionalised cheating

Cheating is a widespread behavioural pattern among Egyptian students that goes often unpunished rendering the parties involved in education responsible

Sarah El Masry