Mohammed Nosseir

33 Articles

Mohammed Nosseir is an Egyptian Liberal Politician working on reforming Egypt on true liberal values, proper application of democracy and free market economy. Mohammed was member of the Higher Committee, and headed the International Relations of the Democratic Front Party from 2008 to 2012

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Latest by Mohammed Nosseir


Traffic Congestion during night in Cairo, hinders cab drivers from making enough money to cover their families’ expenses (DNE/Hassan Ibrahim)

Egyptians’ work attitude from the perspective of Uber & Careem

“I will reach you in just a few minutes,” a driver of one of the new transportation application companies told me recently—which concluded in my being picked up half an hour later. The dilemma of such applications is that most of the drivers don’t take into account the fact that the application technology determines their …

Mohammed Nosseir

The defects in Egypt’s decision-making processes

Facing one crisis after the other has led many Egyptians to believe that overcoming our challenges is beyond our capabilities. This belief is reinforced by the illusion of a conspiracy theory that is espoused by many Egyptians who are convinced that other countries are plotting against us. These two factors have hampered our thought patterns …

Mohammed Nosseir

Are Egyptians victims of their laidback attitude and corruption?

“Offer me a carbonated soft drink, and you can stay here” was a shocking phrase that I heard from a member of former president Hosni Mubarak’s security apparatus as I was waiting for a friend to pick me up in one of the most crowded streets in Cairo, close to the president’s residence. After hearing …

Mohammed Nosseir

The price of Egyptian bureaucracy

  Learning that officials, who are designated to solve Egypt socioeconomic challenges, are the core beneficiaries of keeping them superseded, should have prompted us a long time ago to realise why we have been living with those challenges for decades. This is the myth of Egyptian bureaucracy—a number of old-fashioned executives who have been ruling …

Mohammed Nosseir

Egyptians’ dilemma: our singularly inward-looking focus

Imagining that the entire world revolves around Egypt, combined with our belief that we are always right, has kept Egyptians from coming to terms with universal political dynamics, leaving the entire population trapped within the boundaries of their unique—and false—convictions. Egyptians are “living in a shell” that they have built up around themselves and as …

Mohammed Nosseir

Ideas on how Egypt could liberate its traffic congestion

Aimlessly cruising with a private vehicle in a country like Egypt should not be a personal decision, where citizens lose hours in commuting, which leads to increasing pollution and consuming significant amounts of partially subsidised fuel. The chronic problem of Egypt’s traffic congestion constitutes of drivers’ misbehaviour accompanied by no real penalties, using a large …

Mohammed Nosseir

Egyptian ingenuity: inheriting professions vs natural job succession

Apparently, seeing their child as a “mini-me” pleases many Egyptian parents who are quite eager to observe their life course (entailing the sum of their virtues and vices) portrayed in their children. Happiness and success are often measured in accordance with the parents’ particular perspectives, consisting mainly of children upholding their parents’ values, beliefs—and even …

Mohammed Nosseir

Apart from state repression, why has democracy failed in Egypt?

­­­The only authentic attempt to establish democracy in Egypt—the revolt against Mubarak in 2011— was a complete failure. There is no doubt that Mubarak’s entourage played a major role in bringing Egypt back to square one. Nevertheless, Egyptian politicians and revolutionaries should admit that they too bear a large part of the responsibility; a proper …

Mohammed Nosseir

How Egyptians’ morals justify immoralities

Inspired by their own logic and aided by their talent in justifying their sins, Egyptians tend to transform their disgraceful acts into morally acceptable practices. Living in a country where honour and integrity have been declining steadily over the years, has led many Egyptians, unconsciously, to acknowledge immorality as a cultural norm. Unfortunately, this kind …

Mohammed Nosseir

Al-Sisi: pick your battles to win your war

One of the many difficulties facing President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi lies in his handling of Egypt’s political dynamic from a single, incredibly narrow perspective. The president has tended to deal with political incidents and opponents separately and thus appears to be incapable of visualising the full picture. Applying a repressive policy to each individual political …

Mohammed Nosseir

Are Egyptians naturally bad─or badly ruled?

  ‘Stay home’ is the advice I often give to Egyptians who are unable to tolerate the behaviour of their fellow citizens. In Egypt, the moment a citizen steps out of his home, the wide-ranging drama that literally entails an endless list of interactions (with fellow citizens, vehicles, roads, the environment, etc) begins. The direct …

Mohammed Nosseir

Al-Sisi’s ‘evil people’ myth

When the president of Egypt labels a segment of Egyptian society as the “evil people”, he probably does so based on a particular inspiration of his own. The phrase may have been coined to better serve the president politically, or the president may genuinely believe in the existence of a “true evil” that he has …

Mohammed Nosseir

Will Al-Sisi succeed in neutering Egypt’s vibrant society?

“Neutering is the solution”, a precept that most authoritarians believe in and work towards realising. A quiet, dull, passive society better suits the needs of authoritarian presidents than does a vibrant society that has large numbers of initiators, innovators and, obviously, leaders. Egypt’s main dilemma is that the task of driving and influencing an extremely …

Mohammed Nosseir

Egypt’s battle isn’t about knowledge, it’s about broad-mindedness

  Frequent cabinet reshuffles have aimed at prompting Egyptians to hope that the newly appointed cabinet members will prove to be better qualified than their predecessors were. In fact, the cabinet has been playing only a minor role in driving our country’s progress, which is determined by the overall mindset of the ruling regime. Egypt’s …

Mohammed Nosseir

Protest may be unpleasant, but repression is ugly

  In Egypt, protest and repression spark off from one another. The state, which has a strong grip on the whole society, applies its repressive policy to intimidate citizens and deter them from engaging in demonstrations. Many citizens try to protest against the state to condemn and shout down its repressive policy. The state believes, …

Mohammed Nosseir

Foreigners, but friends of Egypt

I used to think that immigration was about migrants moving from a developing country to a developed one, motivated by a single criterion—the better standard of living. This was until I learned that moving from a country to another is not only a matter of climbing up a ladder; for numerous reasons, people move to …

Mohammed Nosseir

How Egypt is ruled and ruined by opportunists

Egypt is ruled by the maxim: “You must have a stake to have a say.” Egyptians are not governed based on citizenship, which gives everyone equal rights, but based on a stakeholders’ concept that gives more power to citizens who have more wealth and who are closest to the ruler. Egyptian citizenship enables Egyptians to …

Mohammed Nosseir

Al-Sisi’s fans—being loud is not necessarily being right

Being loud does not mean being right, but since Egyptians value loudness over logic, millions of citizens are trapped into believing that their arguments are correct—simply because their voices are loud. Many of the ruling regime’s supporters live under this unfortunate delusion; they compete with their peers by loudly regurgitating the regime’s false arguments. Endlessly …

Mohammed Nosseir

Why Egyptians are more tense today than under Mubarak’s rule

After revolting twice against their rulers in less than five years, Egyptians are now longing for the era of Hosni Mubarak. They long for when the economy was substantially better, security was functioning and the country was more politically stable. After decades of suffering and after paying a high price for their two “revolutions”, Egyptians …

Mohammed Nosseir

Al-Sisi’s defective political reality

“Al-Sisi is a must” was the argument made by his presidential campaign in an effort to offset the absence of political or economic programmes from his campaign platform. After more than 20 months in power, the harsh realities of Al-Sisi have spoken more clearly than any programmes or announcements could have ever done. Al-Sisi’s supporters, …

Mohammed Nosseir

Why Egypt’s ‘Big Brother’ came back, more repressive

“If you don’t have a brother, try to find one” is an Egyptian saying that many believe and live by. Having someone to take care of you is a cultural trait and an obvious privilege; for many Egyptians, it is pure bliss to live in a state that takes good care of its citizens. The …

Mohammed Nosseir

Why Egyptians repeatedly end up with mediocre governments

If you are a scientifically renowned Egyptian citizen harbouring great ambitions for your country with a desire to see it progress faster, please keep your knowledge and ambitions to yourself. The government is not interested in your contribution; Egypt has always been governed by an insentient state that will never be capable of taking notice …

Mohammed Nosseir